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Category: Safety & Compensation

  1. The Most Dangerous Roads for Bikes in the East Midlands

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    Though bikers make up one percent of road traffic, they comprise 19 percent of all fatal traffic accidents according to the Department of Transport. There were 36.7 vehicles licensed for use in Great Britain and 83 percent, or 30.5 million, were cars. It goes without saying that motorbike riders need to take precautions to avoid accidents, but they should pay extra attention on specific roads.  The Most Dangerous Roads for Bikes in the East Midlands

    In addition the Road Crash Index, which has been created by the Road Safety Foundation in collaboration with the insurer Ageas to map out the risk of serious injury and death on Britain’s roads, there are new studies coming out about the safety of roads.

    The Road Crash Index reported that half of all of the United Kingdom’s road death concentrated on ten percent of roads—specially A roads outside of city limits and motorways. Since road death deaths increased in 2016, private entities are using the government figures to find out which roads are the most dangerous.

    Accident Studies A new study from the insurance company Swinton has analysed accident data provided by the government to reveal which roads are the most dangerous for bikers. The data from 2017 revealed that nine out of the most dangerous roads are in London. The other is in Wales. Though they aren’t the most dangerous roads in the country, the study put together a list of the most hazardous roads in the East Midlands.

    Dangerous Roads in the East Midlands

    Of the top ten most dangerous road in the East Midlands, five are in Nottinghamshire. These include Nottingham A6002, A6130, and A611, all of which are in the top five most dangerous roads in the region. Other roads on this top ten include Leicester A563 and A594, High Peak A57, Mansfield A60, East Northamptonshire A6, and Mansfield A6009. Number one most risky road the list for the region is Worcester A38.

    The Details

    The figures from the study show that 584 accidents occurred in the East Midlands during the year 2017. This was 400 more than in the North East, which has the title of least dangerous region for motor bikers. It has a stunning 3,000 less than London. According to MoneyPug, the site used to compare the best bike insurance, the accident rate also declined by six percent. Still the study showed that a staggering one in three motorbike accidents are serious or even fatal. It also showed that Friday is the most dangerous day of the week for motorcyclists and midday Sunday was the most common time for fatal accidents. 

    The Safest Roads

    While the North East is much less dangerous than London and East Midlands, it is not the safest place for motorbike riders in the country. The Road Crash Index has determined that Dunbartonshire has the country’s safest roads. It ranked the highest, with a 32 percent reduction in serious crashes between the years 2010 and 2012 as well 2013 and 2015.

    Not the Most Dangerous, but Not the Safest

    The roads in the East Midlands are not as dangerous as the roads in South Glamorgan, which ranked last of 78 counties. Serious incidents and fatal accidents have increased 27 percent. Still, they are far from the safest. It is the hope of insurance companies like Swinton that if we can raise awareness about the country’s most dangerous roads for cars and bikers alike, we can avoid tragedies and insurance claims. Local politicians have also began pushing for improvements on some of the more dangerous roads.

    Road Safety for Bikers

    It is important for bikers anywhere to be prudent about road safety since they are inherently more dangerous than cars. If you are properly trained, you are also a lot less likely to get into an accident. It is best to have the necessary experience before tackling the most infamous roads in the East Midlands, or anywhere else for that matter. For bikers, it is crucial to be on the defensive. Cars can hurt bikers a lot more than bikers can harm people in cars. With the proper experience and adhering to traffic laws, bikers can avoid accidents on the region’s most dangerous roads and keep themselves safe.

    The Most Dangerous Roads for Bikes in the East Midlands

  2. Britain’s most dangerous roads for motorcyclists

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    Is riding a motorbike in the UK becoming safer or riskier? Find out where the most dangerous roads in your region are, according to the latest Government data*.

    Back in 2017, we created an interactive map that showed where the most dangerous roads in Britain for motorbike accidents were located. Now, we’re taking a look at the latest data, to see whether the most dangerous roads have improved or not, and if there are any new offenders.

    Nationwide top 10 motorbike accident hotspots 2017

    Since 2016, motorbike accidents have decreased by 5%. While this is a positive step in the right direction, the vulnerability of motorcyclists on the road can’t be underestimated, with the data showing that one in three motorbike accidents are serious or fatal.

    The weekend is the most perilous time for motorcyclists, with Friday being the most dangerous day of the week, and Saturday becoming more dangerous year-on-year.

    Sunday is when the most serious or fatal accidents occur. The research shows that it’s mostly bigger bikes (500cc +) involved in these types of accidents, suggesting that they might be happening with motorbike enthusiasts, rather than commuters.

    In terms of who’s most at risk of a motorbike accident, young men were found to be more susceptible, with 92% of crash victims being male, and 37% aged 25 and under.

    And when it comes to weather, it seems that adverse road conditions don’t play a major role in the cause of motorbike accidents, given that 83% of accidents took place during fine weather.

    Most dangerous road for motorcyclists per region

    In 2017, the most dangerous roads in London, the South West and Scotland stayed the same as the previous year.

    Perhaps unsurprisingly, due to higher speed limits and heavier traffic levels, the most dangerous road in each region is an A road.

    See more here

  3. After the heatwave, slippery roads warning

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    Forecasted rain this week could make roads slippery after the heatwave warns the Road Surface Treatments Association (RSTA).

    There are two reasons why motorists should slow down and drive with care on roads that are wet after a heatwave. Firstly, during periods of prolonged hot weather the bitumen in asphalt roads becomes more mobile and can sometime ‘bleed’ through to the surface. This reduces the texture depth and wet skidding resistance. In extreme conditions, like those experienced this summer, councils will apply grit to the road surface to increase its skid resistance. Secondly, dry roads often have a build-up of rubber and oil particles. When it rains these substances can mix with water and create a greasy layer that can become very slippery.

    “Wet roads after a prolonged hot, dry period can become slippery. In addition to ensuring that their tyres are in good condition and properly inflated, motorists should slow down and drive with care”, warned Howard Robinson, RSTA chief executive.

    He continued: “Just like the freezing and ice of the winter, summer’s high temperatures underline how essential it is to ensure that roads are maintained to a correct standard. Unfortunately, continued cutbacks to highway budgets means that councils cannot afford the necessary programmes of long-term maintenance and surface dressing to ensure pothole-free, skid resistant roads.”

  4. Sharing The Road With Motorcycles

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    Motorcycles are less stable and less visible than cars, and they have good performance capabilities which is sometimes bad and sometimes good. For these and other reasons, motorcycles are very much more likely than cars to experience crashes and get involved in accidents.

    At Siima MotoWear, they have done some research and came up with some useful thoughts for both riders and drivers, so they share the road safely and respect each other.

    Motorcycle riders lack the safety of an indoor vehicle, so they're much more likely to get injured or even killed. Per mile traveled, the involving deaths on motorcycles is roughly 26 times the number of a car. Riders who won't be wearing a helmet are 40 % more likely to suffer a fatal head injury, in contrast to helmeted riders.  

    The actions of motorcyclists can affect motor vehicle operators in various ways. When you follow a motorcycle, bear in mind that motorcycles contain the ability of stopping a whole lot more quickly than other vehicles. So keep your distance to yourself and the biker safe. While maintaining a safe and secure distance from motorcyclists in front of you, check your rearview mirror and be aware of motorcyclists following you. When a motorcyclist is following you, be especially careful not to create any sudden stops. Otherwise you set the rider's life in danger.

    Weather and road conditions present greater problems to motorcyclists. A puddle may hide a dent that jolts your car; the same hidden hole can throw a motorcycle out of control. When it rains, reduced traction makes it difficult for riders to balance. Is actually much harder for the motorcyclist to stop or get control of his motobike on slippery roads. Needless to say, things get a lot worse on icy roads.

    Strong winds are extremely dangerous if not knowing how to deal with. In many occasions winds are able to move your bike to the other lane, creating very dangerous conditions for you. Best thing to do is to slow down at the speed you feel comfortable and able to manage your bike. If the winds are really strong better stop the bike. In these cases, drivers should be extra careful and have their eyes open for motorcyclists. Check your mirros and look for single headlight vehicles, they are probably motorcycles.

    When you are following a motorcycle with a pillion riders, be extra careful. Pillion riders' positionand seat can partly control the motorcycle's behavior and performance. If the motorcyclist is inexperienced in transporting a passenger he/she will probably have extra issues with balancing and controlling the motorcycle. 

    Remember to dress for the slide, not the ride. Always use ATGATT, and make sure you use proper motorcycle safety gear.

    See full article here 

    www.siimajackets.com/single-post/sharing-the-road

  5. Here is why you should be able to use the brake at all times

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    I’m hearing it every day. First I see 99.9% of my students braking, and their performance is actually shockingly bad. Straight up… ‘BRAKING’ IS THE PRIOR SKILL TO STAY ALIVE. Then I ask them who taught them and what was the message, and their answers are even more shocking…

    In fact, ANY curriculum of motorcycle drivers license giving institutions are telling new riders to “Stay away from the front brake when turning/leaning!” I believe that this is already a CRIME to say, because I would say that you gotta be be able to make a use of your brakes AT ALL FREAKING TIMES! But there is much more coming with this message- mental blockades which I as a Coach who is teaching the total opposite- have to remove manifested habits and overly produced fears!

    Now how is that?!… well, if you tell a new rider stuff like that- you automatically manifest a certain hold back towards the front brake, which is actually our primary weapon against scary situations. The blockade is so deep in their heads, that most of the riders are not even using 50% of their front brake potential- which is another guarantee to get hurt or even to die. Besides this, it also leads them to an over-usage of rear brake which causes even more confusion and extends their learning curve… which is time they might don’t have.

    You think a street rider don’t need this?… You’re dead wrong! Superbike-Coach teaches ‘Trail Braking’, a MotoGP riding technique since 10 years in Cornering School Day 3, and that is the key to lots of good things the top racers of this planet take advantage of. Priority for them… to lower lap times- and for the street rider to gain the chance to SURVIVE dramatically. Why and how?… find out in the class and learn it, because reading and learning won’t work here.

    Is this a guarantee to get out of everything?… no it’s not, because there is always a ‘point of no return’, but it gains you chance to make it exponentially. Are there other schools teaching to trail brake?… probably- are they doing it right?… from what I know not many. Superbike-Coach does it right- and that we have the environment and drills to do this even better. The curriculum and their message in this regard of license giving institutions has to change, because it is wrong and dangerous.

    www.superbike-coach.com